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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
$800 million in aid to pakistan's military. the u.s. is trying to pressure pakistan to crack down on militants. meanwhile, a suicide bomber struck at a rally, six people were killed there, another 15 wounded. an explosion at a naval base in cyprus when munitions on a cargo ship caught fire. the blast was so huge, it knocked out power to the nation's largest electricity plant, which is right near that base. >>> conservative christian group has retracted a controversial package about slavery from its marriage pledge but not before two presidential candidates actually signed on to it. deputy political director paul steinhauser has the rest of the story here, read iing between t lines. >> a lot of of people talking about this story, iowa, first caucus state. family leader, one of the top social conservative groups in iowa. very, very important, constituents in iowa. and we're talking about traditional marriage, a pledge for the candidates to sign, to promote fidelity with your spouse and promote traditional marriage, not same-sex marriage. the preamble says slavery had a disastrous im
the remaining leaders. >> somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders that between pakistan, yemen, somalia, aqim and north africa, those are -- if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the new al-qaeda chief continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he said he believes the al-qaeda leader may well be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas. and general petraeus, who leaves his post here this month to head the c.i.a., also said today, al-qaeda was on the run, in his opinion. enormous damage is being done to the al-qaeda network over the border in pakistan. back to you. >> rick: david piper on the phone from kabul for us. thanks for the update. >> rick: getting the royal treatment, a polo club in california hosting a future king, prince william is taking part in a charity polo match right now and his new bride, the duchess of cambridge is on hand cheering him on. the royal couple mingling with hollywood royalty on their trip to the u.s. casey stegall live in santa barbara. who is a
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you have people that have had experience in iraq and o
in pakistan just an hour away from islama bad. they raided the congresswoman pound. and in the burst of gun fire, the al qaeda leader was killed and his body buried at sea. as america celebrated and the world wondered about retaliation . >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women who gave their lives against terrorism across the world and pay tribute to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was responsible for 9/11. which was not only a horrific killing of americans but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as a head of a family group of flight 93 put it, we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified and our world is a better place without him. >> while understanding the satisfaction and elation of those who lost family members on 9/11, my friend agrees that the sober reality is that some things are unchanged by the death of osama bin laden. the threat remains and jihad must be confronted and adequate resources, effective international cooperation
is investigating the u.s. raid that killed the al qaeda leader and heightened tensions between pakistan and the united states. >>> jury selection begins today in federal court in washington, d.c. in the trial of pitching great roger clemens. he's accused of lying to congress in 2008 saying he never used performance enhancing drugs, including steroids, during his 23-season career. >>> a body found in an indianapolis creek is not missing indiana university student lauren spierer who disappeared last month. the county coroner says that while the body has yet to be identified, it is definitely not that of spierer. >>> now here's brian williams with what's coming up tonight on nbc "nightly news." >> coming up tonight, with the shuttle program about to come to an end, guess who these are tough times for? john glenn, first american to orbit the earth. we spent some time with him. some tough talk with him about what this era means. that and more when we see you tonight. >>> now for a look at what's trending today. a quick round-up of what has you talking online. web traffic surged tuesday as th
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)